OAS FAQ's

Why and how do we map youth across?

The best way to map youth members skills and achievements is by using the S2P convertor as well as having a discussion with the Scout. The S2P convertor will map old badges across to the OAS however Scouts will have skills that were not part of the previous award scheme that are part of the OAS. To fill these gaps have the Scouts read through the OAS stages and self-assess where they believe their skills are then take this assessment, along with evidence they may have, to their Unit Council for review. For younger Scouts leaders and parents can assist in this.

It is important to note that even though a Scout may have completed I-statements in a higher Stage they must have been able to show competency in all the I-statements of the lower Stages as well.

What are stage progressions?

Stage progressions are the number of stages that a Scout achieves across the Outdoor Adventure Skills, these are tallied within each section. As a Scout moves into the next section, they will keep their current OAS achievements and will wear them on their new section uniform. These OAS stages will form the starting point for counting progressions in the new section. All of the OAS stages completed within the new section will be counted as progressions toward the requirements for the Peak award if they wish to achieve it.

Who can sign off the OAS progressions?

A Scout who is two stages above will be verifying other youth who are progressing through OAS Stages, eg. If a Scout holds Stage 5 Camping they can verify the skills of those who are working on stage 3 or earlier.  If there aren’t Scouts available, Leaders are able to verify as per the following

What are the requirements to run/lead Outdoor Adventure Skill activities?

There are different requirements depending on the activity stream and stages, please explore these requirements here.  Keep an eye out on the Adventurous Activity Teams’ pages for details of upcoming activities and training courses they are running. There are lots of opportunities and ways to get involved and pursue activities that you are interested in and even gain qualifications if you wish to.  

How can Scouts run an activity, what happens with duty of care?

The OAS is designed around Scouts (of all ages) verifying that the other Scouts hold the relevant skills. Scouts will verify others who are 2 stages below them in an area, however Adult Leaders are still required for supervision of activities to ensure risk is managed and correct sign offs occur for the activity to run. Supervision of adventurous activities needs to be in line with the National Adventurous Activity Framework.

What about skills developed outside of Scout. For example, we have a Scout who has done lots of Skiing with their family, can we acknowledge their experience even though it is outside of Scouting?

Absolutely, we should be encouraging this to occur. It is highly likely that the Scout will have completed the early stages within the skill area however they might only have some of the I-statements in the higher stages. As Scouts progress through the stages of the OAS there are a number of requirements focusing on activity organisation, risk management and technical skills, as well as Provide First Aid skills required at Stage 5. We/Unit Council would ask the Scout where they believe they are up to. They should provide evidence such as photos, video, witness sign offs for the I-statements they think they have completed. At higher stages we would be looking for a logbook as well.

There are only a limited number of Adventurous Activity spaces through the Teams. How are we supposed to get our youth through these progressions?

Ideally local support networks will build within Districts/Regions. These will have Scouts and Leaders who are interested and trained/training in particular activities and who are able to support the supervision of activities. Scouts 2 stages above will be able to verify the skills of the other Scouts demonstrating skills.

We have a Scout with special needs how are they going to reach Stage 5 Bushwalking

This is to assessed and adapted on a case-by-case basis, please refer to the Program Handbook. 

How does the streaming work? Do Scouts wear multiple badges to demonstrate each of the streams they have progressed in?

Scouts will wear one badge for each of the 9 skill areas they hold, the highest stage achieved. Although they only wear one badge per area each of the progressions made in the specialist areas is still counted. Eg. In the vertical stream a Scout might hold stage 4 Rock climbing, Stage 5 Abseiling and Stage 6 Caving, in this case they would wear the Stage 6 vertical badge on their uniform and the progressions for each are counted.  

As a Section Leader or Assistant Section Leader what can I oversee?

As a general rule of thumb Joey Scout and Cub Scout Leaders who have completed their Basic Sectional training as well as their Sectional Outdoor training are able to sign off/oversee the core Outdoor Adventure Skills up to and including Stage 3. For Scout, Venturer Leaders and Rovers who have completed their Basic Leader Training as well as a Basic Outdoor Skills (BOS) course can sign off/oversee the core Outdoor Adventure Skills up to and including Stage 5 in the core skill areas.  If you have completed your Scouting Essentials and Scouting Adventure training you can sign off/oversee the core Outdoor Adventure Skills up to and including Stage 3.

View further details here.

What is the best way to map Scouts across to the OAS?

The best way to map youth members skills and achievements is by using the S2P convertor as well as having a discussion with them. Have the Scouts read through the OAS stages and assess where they believe their skills are (for younger Scouts this can occur with the assistance of Parents or Leaders). The self-assessments should then be reviewed and approved by Unit Council. This process should consider previous activities completed, include discussion about activities that weren’t necessarily part of the old award scheme and for higher stages there should be photos and or log of activities.  

It is important to note that even though a Scout may have completed I-statements in a higher Stage, they still must have been able to show competency in all the I-statements of the earlier Stages.

Some good discussion points for Scouts:

  • Where do you think you were when you started in this section (Joeys, Cubs, Scouts, Venturers, Rovers)? (this is for Terrain data import).
  • Where do you think you currently are? (counts toward progressions in current Section).
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